The Wrong Stuff

Here's a fun game for wrongologists: try typing "Alan Greenspan" into Google and waiting for the results from Google Suggest.  (That's the automated feature that shows the top ten searches based on whatever terms you've typed so far, as calculated by some highly proprietary algorithm.)  Here's what currently pops up:

Alan Greenspan biography
Alan Greenspan quotes
Alan Greenspan mistakes
Alan Greenspan wife
Alan Greenspan dermatology...

Here's what I love about wrongness: it's relevant to absolutely everyone in the world.  That single fact kept me sane(ish) throughout the four-year process of writing this book.  True, I lost faith in the writer on a more or less daily basis, but I never once lost faith in the idea.  How could I? Our odd relationship to error and its often monumental consequences are on display in newspapers, world capitals, jury boxes, hospitals, boudoirs, and therapists' offices...

Check out this interesting article about wrongness in today's New York Times.  Diane Ravitch, a longtime advocate of conservative educational policy, has lately undergone what Times writer Sam Dillon describes as “an astonishing, slow-motion about-face on almost every stand she once took on...

Welcome to The Wrong Stuff, a blog about wrong stuff: mistakes and how we respond to them (in politics, business, sports, the arts, education, parenting, domestic life, cooking, you name it); cultural conversations about fallibility and error; and interesting wrongness-related ideas of all sorts.  Please feel free to comment on the posts; I love to hear what other people are thinking (and feeling) about error.  If you’ve got a story to share about being wrong, check...

Okay, maybe you don’t have strong beliefs about the “right” way to load a dishwasher, or about your sweetheart’s propensity to do it “wrong.” In that case, either you are unusually saintly or (like me) you don’t own a dishwasher. But you almost certainly get involved in domestic disputes about who’s right and who’s wrong all the time; we all do. Although interpersonal arguments can have a number of causes – from serious and painful breaches in trust to the fact that we haven’t had our coffee yet – an impressive number of them amount to a tug-of-war over who possesses the truth. We fight over the right to be right.