’Tis with our judgments as our watches, none

Go just alike, yet each believes his own.

—Alexander Pope

Media

Note: Due to the number of media appearances, the harriedness of the author, and (presumably) your limited appetite for listening to every single interview I've ever conducted, the below list is not comprehensive.  If you're looking for the greatest hits, my personal favorites include Talk of the Nation, KQED, Paul Kedrosky's terrific podcast, and -- especially -- New Zealand Public Radio's Kim Hill Show, whose eponymous host is exceptionally funny and smart. 


Talk Of The Nation (NPR)

6/7/2010.  Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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The Takeaway

6/2/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Leonard Lopate (WNYC, New York Public Radio)

6/3/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Forum with Michael Krasny (KQED, California Public Radio)

6/22/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Radio Times (WHYY, Philadelphia Public Radio)

Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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The Conversation with Ross Reynolds (KUOW, Seattle Public Radio)

7/1/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Women's Hour (BBC Radio 4)

10/4/2010.  Click here for more.


HearSay with Cathy Lewis (Virginia Public Radio)

7/9/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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The Colin McEnroe Show (WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio)

7/9/2010. Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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KUER Radio West (Utah Public Radio) 

8/20/10.  Click here for more.


Saturday Morning with Kim Hill (New Zealand Public Radio)

7/31/10.  Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Infectious Talk, hosted by Paul Kedrosky (Kauffman Foundation podcasts on growth, innovation, and entrepreneurship)

8/24/10.  Click here for more, or use the player below to listen.

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Ed Champion's Podcast

Kathryn talks to Ed Champion, 1/1/2010. Click here for more or use the player below to listen.

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Fox News / Strategy Room


Arguably the most famous mistake in the history of science, geocentrism – the belief that the earth is the center of the universe – held sway in the West from ancient Greece until the late 16th century. This erroneous conviction was supported by basic but misleading sensory observations (to the human eye, the sun appears to revolve around the earth, while the ground beneath us feels stationary), as well as by many religious traditions, including Judeo-Christianity. It took the combined work of the astronomers Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler – plus about a century and a half of sluggish belief change – for the correct, heliocentric model of the solar system to become broadly accepted.