’Tis with our judgments as our watches, none

Go just alike, yet each believes his own.

—Alexander Pope

Speaking

As a public speaker, Kathryn Schulz has an uncanny knack for making her audience laugh while also making them think.  Her message about the importance of embracing our innate human fallibility has inspired audiences of every kind, from CEOs to college students, doctors to educators, engineers to religious leaders.  Her talks have received rave reviews from her hosts, including PopTech 2010, the Royal Society of the Arts in London, the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, and many more.  She is available to speak on every aspect of error, including: 

  • The origins of error: how our senses, our minds, and our society can mislead us, and how we can learn to anticipate and prevent those mistakes
  • Why most of us have such negative feelings about wrongness, and how that attitude affects the way we educate our kids, run our companies, and resolve our conflicts -- whether with family members, coworkers, neighbors, or nations
  • How embracing error is, paradoxically, the best way to prevent mistakes  -- including in high-stakes domains where errors can be financially, materially, emotionally or physically costly
  • Why error is such a crucial engine of innovation, and how accepting and understanding our fallibility can make us more creative, more empathetic, and more forgiving, toward ourselves as well as toward other people

Kathryn's presentations generally include lively audiovisual materials, and she tailors each talk to the needs and interests of her audience.  

For information on booking Kathryn for a talk, please contact Alexis Hurley at 
alexis@inkwellmanagement.com
.  

 

The tale of the Trojan Horse might be apocryphal – no one knows – but it stands out as one of military history’s most famous cautionary tales about yielding to unexamined beliefs. The story goes that the Greeks, frustrated by years of waging an unsuccessful siege on the walled city of Troy, built a massive wooden horse, left it at the city gates as a parting “gift” to their putative victors, and pretended to sail home. Ignoring the naysayers (most famously, the prophet Cassandra and the priest Laocoön, both of whom warned their fellow Trojans that the gift was a trap), Troy’s leaders brought the horse inside the city walls. That night, thirty-odd soldiers who had been concealed inside crept out and opened the gates to the returned Greek army. The Greeks destroyed the city and slaughtered its citizens, thereby ending – and winning – the Trojan War.