Our faith is faith in some one else’s faith, and in the greatest matters this is most the case.

—William James

Speaking

As a public speaker, Kathryn Schulz has an uncanny knack for making her audience laugh while also making them think.  Her message about the importance of embracing our innate human fallibility has inspired audiences of every kind, from CEOs to college students, doctors to educators, engineers to religious leaders.  Her talks have received rave reviews from her hosts, including PopTech 2010, the Royal Society of the Arts in London, the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, and many more.  She is available to speak on every aspect of error, including: 

  • The origins of error: how our senses, our minds, and our society can mislead us, and how we can learn to anticipate and prevent those mistakes
  • Why most of us have such negative feelings about wrongness, and how that attitude affects the way we educate our kids, run our companies, and resolve our conflicts -- whether with family members, coworkers, neighbors, or nations
  • How embracing error is, paradoxically, the best way to prevent mistakes  -- including in high-stakes domains where errors can be financially, materially, emotionally or physically costly
  • Why error is such a crucial engine of innovation, and how accepting and understanding our fallibility can make us more creative, more empathetic, and more forgiving, toward ourselves as well as toward other people

Kathryn's presentations generally include lively audiovisual materials, and she tailors each talk to the needs and interests of her audience.  

For information on booking Kathryn for a talk, please contact Alexis Hurley at 
alexis@inkwellmanagement.com
.  

 

We’ve all done it: hollered a confident “hi, Mark!” to a guy named Greg; slipped up and called our sixth grade teacher “Mom”; snuck up on our sister from behind and delivered a pinch, only to realize she was a stranger.   These kinds of gaffes are simultaneously the most mundane and most embarrassing of mistakes. More people than I can count told me stories like these, all of which ended with the speaker expressing the fervent desire to vanish. As one such person put it, “The only thing you can say in these situations is, ‘Sorry, I just had a brain biopsy.’”