I know a person who, when a child, got the notion that when his baby brother was weaned, he was taken up on a grassy hill and tossed about. He had a vivid idea of having seen this curious ceremony.

—James Sully

Speaking

As a public speaker, Kathryn Schulz has an uncanny knack for making her audience laugh while also making them think.  Her message about the importance of embracing our innate human fallibility has inspired audiences of every kind, from CEOs to college students, doctors to educators, engineers to religious leaders.  Her talks have received rave reviews from her hosts, including PopTech 2010, the Royal Society of the Arts in London, the Berlin School of Creative Leadership, and many more.  She is available to speak on every aspect of error, including: 

  • The origins of error: how our senses, our minds, and our society can mislead us, and how we can learn to anticipate and prevent those mistakes
  • Why most of us have such negative feelings about wrongness, and how that attitude affects the way we educate our kids, run our companies, and resolve our conflicts -- whether with family members, coworkers, neighbors, or nations
  • How embracing error is, paradoxically, the best way to prevent mistakes  -- including in high-stakes domains where errors can be financially, materially, emotionally or physically costly
  • Why error is such a crucial engine of innovation, and how accepting and understanding our fallibility can make us more creative, more empathetic, and more forgiving, toward ourselves as well as toward other people

Kathryn's presentations generally include lively audiovisual materials, and she tailors each talk to the needs and interests of her audience.  

For information on booking Kathryn for a talk, please contact Alexis Hurley at 
alexis@inkwellmanagement.com
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In 1867, Czar Alexander II of Russia sold off 586,412 square miles of his country to the United States for the fire-sale price of 1.9 cents per acre, or a total of $7.2 million – about $109 million in today’s money. Convinced that he had disposed of a glorified ice cube, the czar thought he had gotten the better end of the bargain, and many in the U.S. agreed. The journalist Horace Greeley disparaged the deal as an “inconvenient” purchase that offered the buyer “nothing of value but furbearing animals.” Today that inconvenient purchase, better known as Alaska, is worth an estimated $100 billion in oil and gold. In 2008, Forbes magazine described Alexander’s decision to sell Alaska as one of the ten worst business mistakes of the last 400 years.